Your Four Month Old Baby

Your Four Month Old Baby

Four months marks the point when you look back and realize how very easy you had it with a newborn. Remember the days when you could leave your baby on the couch and not worry about what would happen while you quickly ran to the bathroom? Well, those days are OVER. Forever! • You may have to go back to work this month. Whether you’ve been counting down the minutes until you return to the world of actual clothes and conversation, or have been dreading it with all of your might, one thing is for sure: Returning to work will be a huge adjustment for both you and your baby. Be sure to cut yourself some slack, whichever side of the fence you fall on. • Hello, drool. It’s a good thing your baby is so cute at this point, because the drool all over his face all the time… isn’t. Aside from the lovely coating of wetness everywhere, drooling will also result in soaking wet shirts and a possible facial rash. Not to worry; drooling is most likely a sign of teething and won’t stick around forever. • Great news for the sleep-deprived zombie moms: By this point your baby should be developing a somewhat regular sleep schedule (just in time for it to be ruined by your going back to work or their teething). You may even get a few full nights of sleep this month! Enjoy them, because, as you’ve learned by now, no baby phase lasts for long. • If your baby is curious about what you’re eating, can hold his head up and can sit up on his own, he’s probably ready to start solids this month. Say hello to...
Your Three Month Old Baby

Your Three Month Old Baby

Up until three months, you may have found your baby precious, but you were likely (no offense,) one of a select few. With their scrawny bodies, their cone heads and their splotchy skin, newborns just aren’t all that cute! Now, however, your baby has finally filled out and can widely be considered an adorable addition to the human race, rather than something straight out of a horror movie. Hallelujah! • Watch out for your baby’s sudden mobility. Translation: It’s only a matter of time before he rolls off the couch, bed, or changing table, and you’ll wonder if you’re really fit to be a mother, after all. Take a deep breath; babies are incredibly resilient, and yours is most likely fine. (Of course, if you’re really concerned, see a doctor.) Chances are, though, it happened to you when you were an infant and you’re totally normal… right? (Hmmm, maybe you shouldn’t answer that.) • Hand-eye coordination is quickly improving. This means your baby is constantly trying to reach out and touch things and you will soon learn why moms keep their hair in ponytails and stop wearing anything other than stud earrings. In other words, keep your hair in a damn ponytail and stop wearing anything other than stud earrings! • Colic may be making an appearance this month. Some babies experience gas bubbles and indigestion so severe that you may be convinced they are suddenly possessed by the devil. They aren’t, but that’s probably exactly what it feels like to them, too. Laying flat can make things worse, so try swings or bouncy chairs, and be patient; remember how miserable the gas pains you felt during pregnancy were?...
Your Two Month Old Baby

Your Two Month Old Baby

At two months old, your baby is already or will soon start smiling at you, at which point this motherhood gig becomes a whole new ballgame. No longer are you dedicating ’round the clock care to an entirely thankless and endless job; your thanks now comes in the form of precious little baby smiles and there’s nothing better. Finally, some fun for you in all of this. It’s about time! • Keep that camera handy; you’ll want to look back on those sweet smiles when you’re dealing with non-stop screaming a few hours later. In fact, month two marks the period when babies cry the most. Hey, at least they’re smiling, too! • Halfway through this month, you’ll head to your six week check up and most likely get the all-clear from your doctor to start having sex again. If you aren’t ready, (and how the hell would you be?!) LIE. No, honey, the doctor said at least another month until I get the all clear. Here’s a tissue. • If you are ready to jump back in the saddle, remember that breastfeeding isn’t a reliable form of birth control. Unless you want a set of Irish Twins on your hands, (are you INSANE?) get yourself on the pill or set up with an IUD or go old school with condoms. Just figure something out. • If you had a c-section, your excuse to not lift anything, vacuum, or workout is coming to an end. Take it easy when returning to your regular activities; the last thing you want to do is push your body too hard and have to spend even more time recuperating. Scary Mommy Tip: Trust your gut...
Your One Month Old Baby

Your One Month Old Baby

You’ve survived the first few weeks of motherhood!  Things aren’t easy yet (far from it!) but, hopefully, you’re finding some semblance of a groove by now. Feeling weepy is normal at this point, but if you’re crying more often than not, or having thoughts that scare you, it’s definitely time to talk to your doctor about the possibility of PPD. If you are indeed suffering, the sooner you deal with it, the better. Don’t you deserve to experience your new baby without a horrible cloud of depression? Obviously. • Babies love to be touched, and no matter what your mother-in-law might say, you aren’t going to spoil your month-old infant by holding her “too much.” If holding your baby is the only way she’ll stop crying? Hold your freaking baby! Better yet, wear your baby in a sling or carrier of some sort, so you can actually get shit done around the house and your baby can feel close to you. Win/win all the way around. • But, remember: You won’t  harm your baby if you let her cry in the crib or carseat while you take a shower. She’s not going to suffer abandonment issues for life because your hair is standing up on its own and desperately needs to be washed. Really. Go take a shower. Please. • If you’re breastfeeding, hopefully it isn’t quite as hard as it was at first. If you’re miserable and counting down the minutes until it’s over, remember: Your child will not be emotionally, intellectually or physically stunted if you switch to formula. (Your wallet, however, might be, so be sure to sign up for coupons with the formula companies or use the store brands...
The First Days And Weeks After Having A Baby

The First Days And Weeks After Having A Baby

The first days and weeks after having a baby are most likely nothing like you imagined.  For starters, you still look totally pregnant, and will for some time (complete nonsense, yes.) Even worse, for your stomach to begin to flatten back to (somewhat) normal, your uterus needs to contract again, which translates to major discomfort for you. And you thought contractions ended once the baby came out! And remember how beautiful it was not to have a period for nine months? Well, you’re going to be making up for that bliss for the next month or so with something nasty called lochia (blood, mucus, and uterine tissue, oh my!) pouring out of you faster than an extra super maxi-pad can keep up with. Add to that the pain and issues from a possible c-section, episiotomy or rough delivery, and you’re going to feel like a science experiment gone bad for at least the next month. Welcome to motherhood! • Prepare to be overwhelmed. Having a baby can cause even the most even-keeled of women to completely freak the hell out. Try to remember that your baby is just that; a baby, not an alien. You were made to take care of this creature, and you can do it. Really. Even Snooki did! (And, just so you’re prepared, your first few days will most likely look like this.) • If breastfeeding comes easy to you, consider yourself lucky because it takes a while for most moms to figure the whole thing out. Join a support group at your hospital or seek the help of a lactation consultant if you’re struggling. If the experience is completely frustrating and miserable, there’s nothing wrong with switching...